TYA is a chartered Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken Baseball/Softball Program for children ages 4-16 who live in Tuckahoe, Eastchester and Bronxville, New York.

Home
 
 
My my My my
 
 
 
 
 
 
Congratulations - 9U Wins GHVBL Summer League
by Master Admin posted 11/19/2018


Congratulations to 9U for winning the GHVBL Summer League.

TopShare this

 
 
Congratulations - 10U Wins the GHVBL Fall League
by Master Admin posted 11/19/2018


Congratulations - 10U Wins the GHVBL Fall League.

TopShare this

 
 
Congratulations - 11U League Champions
by Master Admin posted 11/05/2018


Congratulations to the 11U Team -

League Champions for the Greater Hudson Valley League.

TopShare this

 
 
Congratulations - 9U Wins the Kensico Columbus Day Tournament
by Master Admin posted 10/10/2018


Congratulations to the TYA 9U Tiger’s on their Victory in the 2018 Kensico Columbus Day Tournament.

TopShare this

 
 
Help Prevent Shoulder and Elbow Overuse Injuries
by Master Admin posted 07/02/2018


Subject: Help Prevent Shoulder and Elbow Overuse Injuries for your TYA Baseball Player

Dear Tuckahoe Youth Association Baseball Parents,

We are proud to have Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) – Westchester as a sponsor this season!!

Shoulder and elbow injuries are common in young athletes. This is due to the nature of many overhand sports, such as baseball, which subject the shoulder and elbow to repetitive motion over extended periods of time. Athletes who play these sports often develop chronic and overuse injuries. It is important to have a good understanding of the major anatomic structures at risk, so that it can be discussed how they get injured and what to do to get them better.

Common Shoulder Injuries

  • Shoulder injuries can be divided into those that occur more acutely versus those that are more chronic in nature. Little Leaguer’s Shoulder is one of the most common injuries in young kids who play overhand sports. Repetitive forces lead to inflammation in the growth plate. As athletes get older and the growth plates close, tendons become the weaker link during the throwing motion. Symptoms include pain when throwing, decreased velocity, pain with overhead activities. Rotator cuff tears are usually encountered in older patients, but occasionally these do occur in teenagers.
  • The diagnosis of these injuries begins with evaluation by a physician who will perform a history and physical exam. Diagnosis is confirmed by x-rays and/or MRI. Conservative treatment is the mainstay for overuse-type shoulder (and elbow) injuries in young athletes. This involves rest from the offending activity and, often, a period of structured physical therapy. Therapists will focus on decreasing inflammation then increasing joint range of motion and strength. Anti-inflammatories and icing of the injured body part can help speed up the recovery.

Common Elbow Injuries

  • One of the most common elbow injuries in young athletes is called Little Leaguer’s Elbow. Little Leaguer’s Elbow, as the name implies, typically affects throwing athletes. The throwing motion puts significant stress on the elbow. Repetitive throwing can cause inflammation in the growth plate of the medial epicondyle or even fractures of the epicondyle. Fracture due to overuse often follows a prodrome of pain in the area without treatment. For this reason, any young athlete with medial-sided elbow pain should refrain from throwing until showing no symptoms.

Injury Prevention & Recovery

  • Strength training can increase muscle strength and endurance, which can help athletes perform better and prevent injury. While some experts suggest that it is okay to start strength training at about 7 or 8 years old, the key is waiting until your child has appropriate balance and posture control. Strength training, which involves the use of weights, tubing or even body-weight resistance exercises to increase strength, differs from body-building or weightlifting where the goal is get bigger.

The keys to strength training in young athletes are focusing on form and safety. Proper technique should be emphasized. Lifting weights that are too heavy can put too much stress on developing tendons, ligaments and growth plates. Young children are much better off doing one set of 10-12 repetitions at a lighter weight focusing on perfect form. Make sure to supervise young children when they are working out. And, make sure the kids are having fun!

For more advice about shoulder and elbow injuries for your little league player, visit http://bit.ly/HSS_little_league_injuries.

As hard as we try to prevent injuries, they do happen at games and practice. HSS Westchester is here for Tuckahoe Youth Association athletes. To request an appointment with an HSS physician, call 914.821.9100  or visit http://bit.ly/HSS_westchester

 

Have a great summer,

Tuckahoe Youth Association Baseball Board 

TopShare this

 
 
TYA Tiger 10U Wins GHVBL 10a Championship
by Master Admin posted 06/04/2018


TYA Tigers 10u won the GHVBL 10a Championship on June 3, 2018.  The Tigers beat Yorktown 1-0 with walkoff hit in the 6th inning in the semifinals and then beat White Plains 11-6 in the championship game. Congrats Tigers!!

TopShare this

 
 
Managing Workload to Protect Your Player's Arm
by Master Admin posted 05/31/2018


Dear Tuckahoe Youth Association families,

We are proud to have Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) – Westchester as a sponsor this season.

Home runs and 100+ mph fastballs: two things baseball fans can’t get enough of! There seems to be more young MLB pitchers throwing heat today than ever before. That said, regardless of the actual radar gun reading, the act of pitching puts a significant amount of strain on arms; as it requires an unnatural overhand motion. The team at HSS – Westchester wants you to know that there are things you can do to manage the workload of young pitchers to prevent injuries and ensure a long successful career.

Because pitchers come in all shapes, sizes and ages, it is impossible to make a sweeping generalization about how many innings one should pitch in a given season. In youth leagues, for example, there are guidelines for how many pitches a pitcher should throw in a week based on recommendations made by USA Baseball. At the college and professional level though, there’s no official guidelines used to impose inning limits. Determining the best plan for a pitcher depends on a couple of things:

  1. Convention – The number of generally accepted pitches is relative to the pitchers age. The breakdown for the recommended number of pitches per day is:
    1. 17-18 years old – 105 pitches
    2. 13-16 years old – 95 pitches
    3. 11-12 years old – 85 pitches
    4. 9-10 years old – 75 pitches
    5. 7-8 years old – 50 pitches
  2. How the pitcher is feeling Are the mechanics starting to break down? Is the pitcher losing heat and missing his spots? Are his pitches becoming more predictable and are the opposing batters getting better swings? All of these subtle clues may indicate the pitcher is starting to fatigue and needs rest.

These days, players are constantly conditioning even during the off-season. Even if a pitcher hasn’t been throwing in the winter, they have been working out or playing another sport. During the season, there are certain warning signs that medical staff and coaches look out for when monitoring a pitcher to see if he is in need of rest, including:

  • Is he getting hit hard each time he’s on the mound?
  • Is his velocity down?
  • Is he taking longer than usual to warm up? Is he having difficulties loosening up?
  • Is he having control problems?

 

Without a doubt, there will be normal fatigue and wear-and-tear during the course of a season so those observations will all have to be taken into context with how the pitcher is performing and feeling. If a pitcher is showing these signs, it is best to give him an extra day of rest and possibly change up the rotation.

There is no exact science behind the exact number of pitches and innings any given pitcher should throw in a season. It’s best for medical staff and coaches to work together to figure out a personalized plan for each individual pitcher to maximize their potential while keeping them safe and healthy.

For more in-depth movement pattern exercises for your soccer player, visit http://bit.ly/hss_protect_young_arms.

As hard as we try to prevent injuries, they do happen at games and practice. HSS Westchester is here for Tuckahoe Youth Association athletes. To request an appointment with an HSS physician, call 914.821.9100  or visit http://bit.ly/HSS_westchester

 

See you at the fields!

The Tuckahoe Youth Association Team 

TopShare this

 
 
12U Wins the Bergen County Classic Tournament
by Master Admin posted 05/29/2018


Congratulations to the 12U team for winning the Bergen County Classic Tournament.

TopShare this

 
 
10U Wins the Bergen County Classic Tournament
by Master Admin posted 05/29/2018


Congratulations to the 10U team for winning the Bergen County Classic Tournament.

TopShare this

 
 
12U Team Wins Bring The Heat Tournament
by Master Admin posted 04/17/2018


Congratulations to the 12U Tigers Team for winning the Bring The Heat Tournament.  

TopShare this